Habsburg Cities and Urban Space in East Central Europe Around 1900

Level: 
Master's
Course Status: 
Elective
CEU credits: 
4
Academic year: 
2010/2011
Semester: 
Winter
Start and end dates: 
10 Jan 2011 - 1 Apr 2011
Stream/Track/Specialization/Core Area: 
Social and Political History in a Comparative Perspective
Instructor(s): 
Markian Prokopovych
Additional information: 
Part and parcel of the global context of urbanization, this region’s urban experience is crucial to the understanding of the condition of modernity and its consequences for culture. The city was both the catalyst and a product of this change that documented itself in various fields of what we broadly call culture: everyday practices and special events, royal celebrations and urban revolts, the reports of the modern press and the municipal (and other) approaches to urban “improvement,” the changing cultural norms of behavior and, lastly, diverse representations in architecture, music, theatre and the arts. Hence a diverse array of approaches and methodologies offered within these fields as attempts to explore Habsburg cities and their counterparts to the East, South-East and West. Method: Each week consists of an overview lecture on the topic by the instructor, and a seminar session in which at least three student presentations of the assigned readings are followed by a discussion moderated by the instructor. There will be a possibility to choose alternative text material from the course’s optional readings for each class. Comparative approach is applied systematically.
Learning Outcomes: 
The course provides the students with a comprehensive and critical understanding of the recent scholarship on urban history in the Habsburg Empire in a larger European, East-Central European, and South-East European context and a broader overview of diverse aspects of urban culture at the turn of the century; the course also develops skills and techniques of comparative analysis and their application to urban, cultural and political history in the region and therefore aims at developing a new research agenda for urban studies.
Assessment : 
The attendance of all class sessions is mandatory. Missing two sessions without providing a legitimate proof of absence will result in failing the course. The final grade will be composed of class participation, including regular presentations of the required reading in class throughout the course (40 %) and a final essay (3,000-4,000 words; 60 %). Optional weekly class journal assignments will be offered for those interested exploring the topics further and those will be provided with a detailed and regular feedback (10 %).

Last week's lecture here

Katalin Straner's lecture on the Hungarian Press

READINGS

(1) Habsburg Cities around 1900: An Introduction

Reading:

Mikulás Teich and Roy Porter, eds., Fin de siécle and Its Legacy. Cambridge University Press 1993, 1-27, 80-97. [savepdf][savepdf]

Carl E. Schorske, “Politics in a New Key: An Austrian Trio,” Fin-de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture. Cambridge University Press 1981, 116-80. [savepdf] [link]

Lynne Hapgood, “Urban Utopias: Socialism, Religion and the City, 1880 to 1900,” in Sally Ledger and Scott McCracken, Cultural Politics at the Fin de Siècle. Cambridge University Press 1995, 184-201. [savepdf]

Optional:

Stephen Frank, “Confronting the Domestic Order: Rural Popular Culture and Its Enemies in fin de siècle Russia,” in Stephen Frank, Mark D. Steinberg, eds, Cultures in Flux: Lower-class Values, Practices, and Resistance in Late Imperial Russia. Princeton University Press 1994, 74-107. [savepdf]

Edhem Eldem, Daniel Goffman, Bruce Alan Masters, The Ottoman City between East and West: Aleppo, Izmir, and Istanbul. Cambridge University Press 1999, 125-34, 196-206. [savepdf]

Zeynep Celik, Empire, Architecture, and the City: French-Ottoman Encounters, 1830-1914. University of Washington Press 2008, 80-1. [savepdf]

Mark Mazower, Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims, and Jews, 1430-1950. Alfred A. Knopf 2005, 209-37. [savepdf]

Robert J. Donia, “The Making of Fin de siecle Sarajevo,” Sarajevo: A Biography. University of Michigan Press 2006, 60-92. [link]

(2) Urbanization: Generalities and Specifics

Reading:

Wolfgang Maderthaner, Lutz Musner, Unruly Masses: The Other Side of Fin-de-siècle Vienna. Berghann Books 2008, 31-57. [savepdf]

Daniel R. Brower, The Russian City Between Tradition and Modernity, 1850-1900. University of California Press 1990, 7-39. [savepdf]

Edhem Eldem, Daniel Goffman, Bruce Alan Masters, “Introduction: Was There an Ottoman City?” and “Conclusion,” The Ottoman City between East and West: Aleppo, Izmir, and Istanbul. Cambridge University Press 1999, 1-16, 207-14. [savepdf]

Optional

Robert Lee, “Demography, Urbanization and Migration”, in Stefan Berger, ed., A Companion to Nineteenth-century Europe, 1789-1914. Blackwell 2006, 56-69. [savepdf]

Walter Moss, “Population, Towns and Urban Society,” A History of Russia. McGraw-Hill 1997, 121-4. [savepdf]

Nikolai Todorov, The Balkan City. University of Washington Press 1983, 456-63. [savepdf]

Donald Quataert, “The European Provinces, Istanbul, West and West-Central Anatolia,” Ottoman Manufacturing in the Age of the Industrial Revolution. Cambridge University Press 2002, 49-61. [savepdf]

Donald Quataert. Social Disintegration and Popular Resistance in the Ottoman Empire, 1881-1908: Reactions to European Economic Penetration, New York University Press 1983, 95-120. [savepdf]

Zeynep Celik, The Remaking of Istanbul: Portrait of an Ottoman City in the Nineteenth Century. University of California Press 1993, 31-81. [savepdf]

(3) Urban Government and City Politics

Richard S. Geehr, Karl Lueger: Mayor of Fin De Siècle Vienna. Wayne State University Press 1990, 143-70. [savepdf]

Zsuzsa L Nagy, “Transformations in the City Politics of Budapest: 1873-1941,” in Thomas Bender and Carl E. Schorske, eds, Budapest and New York. Studies in Metropolitan Transformation. Russell Sage Foundation 1994, 35-54. [savepdf] [link]

Daniel R. Brower, The Russian City Between Tradition and Modernity, 1850-1900. University of California Press 1990, 92-139. [savepdf]

Dobrinka Parusheva, “Running ‘Modern’ Cities in a Patriarchal Milieu: Perspectives from the Balkans,” in Ralf Roth and Robert Beachy, eds. Who Ran the Cities? City Elites and Urban Power Structures in Europe and North America, 1750-1940. Ashgate 2007, 179-94. [savepdf]

Optional:

Karin Brown, Karl Lueger, the Liberal Years: Democracy, Municipal Reform, and the struggle for power in the Vienna City Council, 1875-1882. Garland 1987. [savepdf]

Árpád Tóth, “Voluntary Society as Power Agency in mid-19th Century Pest. Urbanization and the Changing Distribution of Power,” in Robert Beachy and Ralf Roth, eds. Who Ran the Cities? City Elites and Urban Power Structures in Europe and North America, 1750-1940. Ashgate 2007, 161-77. [savepdf]

(4) Urban Society and Culture

Reading:

Gary Cohen, "Society and Culture in Prague, Vienna, and Budapest in the late Nineteenth Century," East European Quarterly 20 (1986), 467-84. [savepdf]

Mikulás Teich and Roy Porter, eds., Fin de siécle and Its Legacy. Cambridge University Press 1993, 98-114.[savepdf]

Bozidar Jezernik, “Western Perceptions of Turkish Towns in the Balkans,” Urban History 25 (August 1998) 2, 211-30. [savepdf]

Optional:

Richard Stites, “In Old Russia,” Russian Popular Culture: Entertainment and Society since 1900. Cambridge University Press 1992, 9-36. [savepdf]

Donald Quataert, “Ottoman Society and Popular Culture,” The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922. Cambridge University Press 2000, 142-73. [savepdf]

Haris Exertzoglou, "The Cultural Uses of Consumption: Negotiating Class, Gender, and Nation in the Ottoman Urban Centers during the 19th Century," International Journal of Middle East Studies 35 (Feb., 2003) 1, 77-101. [savepdf]

(5) Architecture and Representation

Reading:

Carl E. Schorske, “Ringstrasse, Its Critics and the Birth of Urban Modernism,” Fin-de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture. Cambridge University Press 1981, 24-115. [savepdf]

Particia Herlihy, “Commerce and Architecture in Odessa in Late Imperial Russia” in William Craft Brumfield, B. V. Ananich and Yuri A. Petrov, eds, Commerce in Russian Urban Culture: 1861-1914. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 2001, 180-94. [savepdf]

Nora Seni, "The Camondos and Their Imprint on 19th-Century Istanbul," International Journal of Middle East Studies 26 (Nov., 1994) 2, 663-75. [savepdf]

Optional:

Markian Prokopovych, Habsburg Lemberg: Architecture, Public Space, and Politics in the Galician Capital, 1772-1914. Purdue University Press 2009, 1-18. [savepdf]

Sergei G. Beliaev, “Funded Loans in Petersburg and the Development of the Municipal Infrastructure, 1875-1916,” in William Craft Brumfield, B. V. Ananich and Yuri A. Petrov, eds, Commerce in Russian Urban Culture: 1861-1914. Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars 2001, 39-47. [savepdf]

William C. Brumfield, "Anti-Modernism and the Neoclassical Revival in Russian Architecture, 1906-1916," The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 48 (Dec., 1989) 4, 371-86. [savepdf]

Klaus Roth, Ulf Brunnbauer, Urban Life and Culture in Southeastern Europe. Lit Verlag 2008.  [savepdf]

(6) Monuments and the Public Space

Reading:

Dunja Richtman-Augustin, “The Monument in the Main City Square,” in Maria Todorova, ed, Balkan Identities: Nation and Memory. New York University Press 2004, 180-96. [savepdf]

Michael Laurence Miller, “A Monumental Debate in Budapest: The Hentzi Statue and the Limits of Austro-Hungarian Reconciliation, 1852–1918,” Austrian History Yearbook 40 (2009) April, 215-37. [savepdf]

Cynthia Paces, “The Battle for Public Space on Prague's Old Town Square,” in John J. Czaplicka, Blair A. Ruble, Lauren Crabtree, eds. Composing Urban History and the Constitution of Civic Identities. Woodrow Wilson Center Press 2003, 165-91. [savepdf]

Klaus Kreiser, "Public Monuments in Turkey and Egypt, 1840-1916," Muqarnas 14 (1997), 103-17. [savepdf]

Optional:

Zeynep Çelik, "Bouvard's Boulevards: Beaux-Arts Planning in Istanbul," The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 43 (Dec., 1984) 4, 341-55. [savepdf]

Jeremy King, “The Nationalization of East Central Europe: Ethnicism, Ethnicity and Beyond,” in Maria Bucur and Nancy Wingfield, eds, Staging the Past: The Politics of Commemoration in Habsburg Central Europe, 1848 to the Present. Purdue University Press 2001, 112-52. [savepdf]

(7) The Street Spectacle

Reading:

Daniel L. Unowsky, The Pomp and Politics of Patriotism: Imperial Celebrations in Habsburg Austria, 1848-1916. Purdue University Press 2005, 145-74. [savepdf]

William M. Johnston, “Hans Makart: Culture Hero of a Decorative Era,” The Austrian Mind: An Intellectual and Social History, 1848-1938. University of California Press 1972, 141-3. [savepdf]

Richard Wortman, Scenarios of Power: From Alexander II to the Abdication of Nicholas II. Princeton University Press 1995, 282-302. [savepdf]

Jens Hanssen, Fin de Siècle Beirut: The Making of an Ottoman Provincial Capital. Oxford University Press 2005, 255-63. [savepdf]

Optional:

Albin Konechyi, “Shows for the People: Public Amusement Parks in Nineteenth-Century St. Petersburg,” in Stephen Frank and Mark D. Steinberg, eds, Cultures in Flux: Lower-class Values, Practices, and Resistance in Late Imperial Russia. Princeton University Press 1994, 121-30. [savepdf]

Zeynep Celik, Empire, Architecture, and the City: French-Ottoman Encounters, 1830-1914. University of Washington Press 2008, 236-40. [savepdf]

Ibrahim Muwaylihi, Roger M. A. Allen, Spies, Scandals, and Sultans: Istanbul in the Twilight of the Ottoman Empire. Rowman & Littlefield 2008, 87-95, 103-18. [savepdf]

Patrice M. Dabrowski, Commemorations and the Shaping of Modern Poland. Indiana University Press 2004, 159-83. [savepdf]

(8) Women, Gender and the City

Reading:

Susan Zimmermann, “’Making a Living from Disgrace’: The Politics of Prostitution, Female Poverty and Urban Gender Codes in Budapest and Vienna, 1860s - 1920s,” in Malcolm Gee, Tim Kirk and Jill Steward, eds., The City in Central Europe: Culture and Society in Central Europe since 1800. Ashgate 1999, 175-95. [savepdf]

Agatha Schwartz, Shifting Voices: Feminist Thought and Women's Writing in Fin-de-siècle Austria and Hungary. McGill-Queen's University Press 2008, 3-19. [savepdf]

Catriona Kelly, “’Better Halves?’ Representations of Women in Russian Urban Popular Entertainment,’ in Linda Harriet Edmondson, ed., Women and Society in Russia and the Soviet Union. Cambridge University Press 1992, 5-31. [savepdf]

Gila Hadar, “Jewish tobacco owners in Salonika: Gender and Family in the Context of the Ethnic Strife” in Amila Buturovic, Irvin Cemil Schick eds., Women in the Ottoman Balkans: Gender, Culture and History. I.B. Tauris 2007, 127-52. [savepdf]

Optional:

Fanny Davis. The Ottoman Lady: A Social History from 1718 to 1918. Greenwood Press 1986, 131-70. [link]

Sally Ledger, “The New Woman in the Modern City,” The New Woman: Fiction and Feminism at the Fin de siècle. Manchester University Press 1997, 150-76. [link]

Sally Ledger, “The New Woman and the Crisis of Victorianism," in Sally Ledger and Scott McCracken, eds., Cultural Politics at the Fin de Siecle. Cambridge University Press 1995, 22-44. [savepdf]

Alison Rose, Jewish Women in Fin-de-siécle Vienna. University of Texas Press 2008, 1-7. [savepdf]

(9) New Press and the New Metropolitan Identity

Reading:

Nathaniel D. Wood, “Urban Self-identification in East Central Europe before the Great War: The Case of Cracow,” ECE 33 (2006) 1-2, 11-31. [link]

Daniel R. Brower, "The Penny Press and Its Readers," in Stephen Frank, Mark D. Steinberg, eds, Cultures in Flux: Lower-class Values, Practices, and Resistance in Late Imperial Russia. Princeton University Press, 1994, 147-67. [savepdf]

Palmira Johnson Brummett, Image and Imperialism in the Ottoman Revolutionary Press, 1908-1911. State University of New York 2000, 259-316. [savepdf]

Optional:

Charles A. Ruud, Fighting Words: Imperial Censorship and the Russian Press, 1804-1906. University of Toronto Press 1982, 181-226. [savepdf]

Robin Okey, Taming Balkan Nationalism: The Habsburg ‘Civilizing Mission’ in Bosnia. Oxford University Press 2007, 217-58. [savepdf]

Mark Mazower, Salonica, City of Ghosts: Christians, Muslims, and Jews, 1430-1950. Alfred A. Knopf 2005, 230-4. [savepdf]

Daniel R. Brower, The Russian City Between Tradition and Modernity, 1850-1900. University of California Press 1990, 170-87. [savepdf]

Alexander Orbach, New Voices of Russian Jewry: A Study of the Russian-Jewish Press of Odessa in the Era of the Great Reforms, 1860-1871. Brill 1980, 196-207. [link]

(10) The Jews

Reading:

Cathleen M. Giustino, Tearing Down Prague's Jewish Town: Ghetto Clearance and the Legacy of Middle-Class Ethnic Politics Around 1900. East European Monographs, 2003. [savepdf]

K. M. Knittel, “’Ein hypermoderner Dirigent’: Mahler and Anti-Semitism in ‘Fin-de-siècle’ Vienna,” 19th-Century Music 18 (Spring, 1995) 3, 257-76. [savepdf]

Sarah Abrevaya Stein, Making Jews Modern: The Yiddish and Ladino Press in the Russian and Ottoman Empires. Indiana University Press 2004, 1-20. [savepdf]

Optional:

Michael Stanislawski, “From Jugendstil to ‘Judenstil’” and “Vladimir Jabotinsky: From Odessa to Rome and Back,” Zionism and the Fin de siècle: Cosmopolitanism and Nationalism from Nordau to Jabotinsky. University of California Press 2001, 98-149. [savepdf]

George L. Mosse, “Max Nordau: Liberalism and the New Jew,” in George L. Mosse, Confronting the Nation: Jewish and Western Nationalism. Brandeis University Press by University Press of New England 1993, 161-175. [savepdf]

Steven E. Aschheim, “Friedrich Nietzsche, Max Nordau, and Degeneration,” in Steven E. Aschheim, In Times of Crisis: Essays on European culture, Germans, and Jews. University of Wisconsin Press 2001, 3-12. [savepdf]

(11) Serious entertainment

Reading:

Charles Maier, “Mahler’s Theater: The Performative and the Political in Central Europe, 1890-1910,” in Karen Painter, ed., Mahler and His World. Princeton University Press 2002, 55-86. [savepdf]

William M. Johnston, The Austrian Mind: An Intellectual and Social History, 1848-1938. University of California Press 1972, 128-40. [savepdf]

Katerina Clark, Petersburg: Crucible of Cultural Revolution. Harvard University Press 1995, 74-99. [savepdf]

Walter Moss, “Music” and “Popular Culture,” A History of Russia. McGraw-Hill 1997, 155-60. [savepdf]

Nermin Menemencioglu, “The Ottoman Theatre 1839-1923,” Bulletin of the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies 10 (1983) 1, 48-58. [savepdf]

Optional:

Richard Taruskin, Defining Russia Musically: Historical and Hermeneutical Essays. Princeton University Press 1997, 186-235. [savepdf]

Zeynep Celik, Empire, Architecture, and the City: French-Ottoman Encounters, 1830-1914. University of Washington Press 2008, 201-3. [savepdf]

Fritz Weber, “Heroes, Meadows and Machinery: Fin-de-siecle Music,” in Mikulás Teich and Roy Porter, eds., Fin de siécle and Its Legacy. Cambridge University Press 1993, 216-34.[savepdf]

Anselm Gerhard, The Urbanization of Opera: Music Theater in Paris in the Nineteenth Century. University of Chicago Press 1998, 1-16. [savepdf]

Alice Freifeld, Nationalism and the Crowd in Liberal Hungary, 1848-1914. Woodrow Wilson Center Press 2000, 25-58. [savepdf]

Hubertus F. Jahn, Patriotic Culture in Russia during World War I. Cornell University Press 1998, 171-8. [savepdf]

(12) Popular Entertainment

Reading:

Camille Crittenden, Johann Strauss and Vienna: Operetta and the Politics of Popular Culture. Cambridge University Press 2000, 91-120. [savepdf]

Denise Jeanne Youngblood, “At the Movies: Theatres, Owners, Audiences,” The Magic Mirror: Moviemaking in Russia, 1908-1918. University of Wisconsin Press 1999, 33-45. [savepdf]

Harold B. Segel, Turn-of-the-century Cabaret: Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, Munich, Vienna, Cracow, Moscow, St. Petersburg, Zurich. Columbia University Press 1987, 183-320. [savepdf]

Dror Ze’evi, “Boys in the Hood: Shadow Theatre as a Sexual Counter-Script,” Producing Desire: Changing Sexual Discourse in the Ottoman Middle East, 1500-1900. University of California Press 2006, 125-48. [savepdf]

Optional:

Eugène Anthony Swift, Popular Theater and Society in Tsarist Russia. University of California Press 2002, 1-38. [savepdf]

Barbara Lesak, “Photography, Cinematography and the Theatre: A History of a Relationship,” in Mikulás Teich and Roy Porter, eds., Fin de siécle and Its Legacy. Cambridge University Press 1993, 132-46. [savepdf]

(13) Everyday Life

Reading:

William M. Johnston, The Austrian Mind: An Intellectual and Social History, 1848-1938. University of California Press 1972, 119-24. [savepdf]

Gábor Gyáni, Identity and the Urban Experience: Fin-de-siécle Budapest. Boulder: Social Science Monographs 2004, 4-23. [savepdf]

Daniel R. Brower, The Russian City Between Tradition and Modernity, 1850-1900. University of California Press 1990, 140-53. [savepdf]

Cem Behar, “’End of Empire’: Portrait of a Neighborhood Community in the Late Nineteenth Century,” A Neighborhood in Ottoman Istanbul: Fruit Vendors and Civil Servants in in the Kasap ÿlyas Mahalle. SUNY Press 2003, 131-72. [savepdf]

Optional:

Erika Szívós, “Fin-de-Siècle Budapest as a Center of Art,” ECE 33 (2006) 1-2, 141-68. [savepdf]

Donald Quataert, “Ottoman Society and Popular Culture,” The Ottoman Empire, 1700-1922. Cambridge University Press, 2000, 154-62. [savepdf]

Alan Duben and Cem Behar, Istanbul Households: Marriage, Family and Fertility, 1880-1940. Cambridge University Press 2002, 1-47. [savepdf]